The trendy new term comes at a time where an increasing number of business travelers are extending their trips for a few days to include some element of leisure travel. The big question: in a gray area like this, who is liable for your safety when you start dreaming of palm trees?

business-travel-duty-of-care

Heading out of town for work is undoubtedly not the most thrilling reason to travel (and may not bring you to any wanderlust-esque destinations). But once you, your company or your client have already invested in your basic travel arrangements, why not switch gears and get on with your tourist self for a few days? Book a luxury hotel for a night, discover your favorite local restaurant, find the city's best view for sunset... We digress.

In international or high-risk destinations, risk assessment and/or tracking for business travelers is a given and should be included in an organization's travel policy. (If not, let's talk.)

With up to 75% of road warriors requesting to tack on vacation days, travel buyers have a moral obligation to address the level of duty of care they extend past a business trip. And since only one third of companies who allow "bleisure" travel overlap their protection to vacation days, you might be out on your own.

To be sure, always ask what your options are, from corporate policy to travel insurance. And when in doubt, your travel specialists are here to guide you.



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